If you could maximise the emotional, psychological and social well-being of your child you would, right?

1 in 4 people in England experience a mental health problem of some kind each year 1 and 50% of mental health problems are established by age 14 2

Unresolved emotional difficulties in childhood can lead to anxiety, depression and other issues like relationship difficulties, comfort eating and alcohol dependency in teenage years and adulthood.

Read Snouffles – Stories for Confidence and Peace to your children to give them the emotional resilience to thrive and be happy in a world full of challenge.

Book
AudioPack

If you could maximise the emotional, psychological and social well-being of your child you would, right?

1 in 4 people in England experience a mental health problem of some kind each year1 and 50% of mental health problems are established by age 142 

    Read Snouffles – Stories for Confidence and Peace to your children to give them the emotional resilience to thrive and be happy in a world full of challenge.

Snouffles – Stories for Confidence and Peace is not a picture book. It is a carefully crafted book of mesmerising stories that features mindfulness, empathic connection, hypnotic suggestions, philosophy and easy-to-use strategies.

As each story begins with a relaxing visualisation, it is best for children to close their eyes to listen. By first relaxing the mind and body, the messages contained within the stories are more easily absorbed by the part of the mind that is responsible for creating thoughts and emotions. Simply listening to the stories has shown to be enough to transform difficult emotions into comfortable ones.

F.A.Q.s

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These stories help all children to develop resilience through learning about thoughts, feelings and behaviour. They are especially helpful to children who experience any of the issues that the Snouffles experience in the stories.
 
This includes children who often

  • Feel angry and hurt
  • Experience difficulties coping with making ‘mistakes’
  • Feel stupid or embarrassed
  • Feel different
  • Misunderstand other people’s behaviour
  • Experience a lot of judgement or fear judgement
  • Are afraid of getting it ‘wrong’
  • Get left out
  • Feel lonely
  • Have low self esteem, or don’t feel like they are good enough

 
They are most suitable for children aged 6 – 10 years, although older children and adults have expressed love and appreciation of the stories too

The Snouffles are simple creatures that have no gender or age. The focus of each story is on what they experience in their minds and bodies in response to whatever is going on around them. This means that the listener can identify with the experience rather than finding similarities or differences with the character description. It makes them more inclusive.

They live near Snouffle mountain and are like you and me in that they experience a range of everyday dilemmas and difficulties. They also experience a variety of emotions and responses to those challenges. They sometimes feel angry, sad, confused, afraid, misunderstood and many other emotions too. They always discover a way to resolve their difficulties and feel happy again.

The Snouffles face numerous challenges including:

  • being misunderstood and misjudged
  • getting left out
  • feel self doubt
  • having difficult decisions to make
  • face criticism
  • make mistakes
  • misunderstanding others
  • being treated differently
  • feeling scared
  • experiencing anger

 

 

Stories are a fantastic medium to teach children about thoughts, emotions and behaviour because of the power of stories on the mind. When the imagination is fully engaged, the unconscious mind can easily absorb all the wisdom and strategies that are communicated through the story.  


Often in the stories it is the first time a Snouffle has experienced a particular emotion and this causes the Snouffle to contemplate what is happening. Through following the sequence of thoughts, feelings, decisions and consequences, the Snouffles show us how faulty thinking often creates conflict and difficulties for ourselves and others. 


With a greater self-awareness and understanding of our own thought processes and emotions, we can change our thinking and transform the difficult emotions into more pleasant ones. Knowing how to create pleasant feelings inside, without anyone else saying or doing anything, is a very valuable skill. It is empowering to realise that we do not have to rely on anyone else to feel okay. 

At the end of each story there are some questions that may be, but don’t have to be, answered aloud. They help the mind to further process the awareness gained. There are also some activities to do which develop coping skills and mindfulness. This inclusive and participatory approach can support both adult and child at the same time.

In addition to the issues listed above, the stories help children to develop empathy and understanding for themselves and others. This reduces both the occurrence of conflict and the intensity of reaction when it does occur. Through listening to the stories children can become better able to notice, name and manage difficult emotions as they arise.

Through learning about opinions, judgement and choices, children can find the confidence to express their own personality with less fear of the judgement of others.

As the book is designed to be shared with adults, they too can benefit from the wisdom contained within the stories. This may be through an increased self-awareness or it may be through being able to refer to the stories to address sensitive emotions with children in a compassionate and non-judgemental way.

 

References

1 McManus, S., Meltzer, H., Brugha, T. S., Bebbington, P. E., & Jenkins, R. (2009). Adult psychiatric morbidity in England, 2007: results of a household survey.

2 Kessler RC, Berglund P, Demler O, Jin R, Merikangas KR, Walters EE. (2005). Lifetime Prevalence and Age-of-Onset Distributions of DSM-IV Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication. Archives of General Psychiatry, 62 (6) pp. 593-602. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.62.6.593.